The Random Ramblings of Mischief.......

heisenburger:

micdotcom:

For $50, this tiny box will keep everything you do online anonymous

From National Security Agency spying to governments blocking portions of the Internet in times of unrest, recent controversies have demonstrated just how little freedom we actually have online
But what if there were a way to stay hidden 24/7 on the Internet, free from detection and censorship?
Meet this new Kickstarter project, anonabox | Follow @micdotcom


THIS IS INSECURE. DO NOT BACK THIS. The hardware is an off-the-shelf alibaba product that’s $20 a unit. The box’s root password has been easily cracked. The wireless SSHD is the same for every box, allowing one owner to easily attack other owners of the box. Worse still, it’s being marketed to protestors, journalists and whilsteblowers as a secure device, when actually it’s pea-brained configuration of tor that in some ways makes it easier to attack than if you were connected to a public wireless network. The creator of this device has lied about every stage of it’s inception and purpose.Wired did a good writeup of the discoveries here: http://www.wired.com/2014/10/anonabox-backlash/

heisenburger:

micdotcom:

For $50, this tiny box will keep everything you do online anonymous

From National Security Agency spying to governments blocking portions of the Internet in times of unrest, recent controversies have demonstrated just how little freedom we actually have online

But what if there were a way to stay hidden 24/7 on the Internet, free from detection and censorship?

Meet this new Kickstarter project, anonabox | Follow @micdotcom

THIS IS INSECURE. DO NOT BACK THIS. The hardware is an off-the-shelf alibaba product that’s $20 a unit. The box’s root password has been easily cracked. The wireless SSHD is the same for every box, allowing one owner to easily attack other owners of the box. Worse still, it’s being marketed to protestors, journalists and whilsteblowers as a secure device, when actually it’s pea-brained configuration of tor that in some ways makes it easier to attack than if you were connected to a public wireless network. The creator of this device has lied about every stage of it’s inception and purpose.

Wired did a good writeup of the discoveries here: http://www.wired.com/2014/10/anonabox-backlash/

(via symphonyregalia)

chrisbrinleejr:

Today was fun. We found our own private blue lagoon up in the mountains 45 minutes southwest of Reykjavik, Iceland. The water was warmed by the many hot springs located in the area; temperatures were balanced out by the cool water flowing in. Perfect. We were the only people around for miles; our spirits could not be contained.

(via semperfidelismarines)

“There’s a storm inside of us,
I’ve heard many team guys speak of this.
A burning.
A river.
A drive.
An unrelenting desire to push your self harder and farther than anyone could think possible.
It pushes us into those cold dark corners,
Where the bad things live,
Where the bad things fight.
We wanted that fight at the highest volume.
A loud fight.
The loudest, coldest, darkest most unpleasant of the unpleasant fight”
— Marcus Luttrell (via blackbeard-actual)

(via semperfidelismarines)

Óscar Arístides de la Renta Fiallo (July 22, 1932 – October 20, 2014) was a Dominican fashion designer. Born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, De la Renta was trained by Cristóbal Balenciaga and Antonio del Castillo, he became internationally known in the 1960s as one of the couturiers to dress Jacqueline Kennedy. An award-winning designer, he worked for Lanvin and Balmain; his eponymous fashion house continues to dress leading figures, from film stars to royalty, into the 2010s. De la Renta is particularly known for his red carpet gowns and evening wear.

At the age of 18, he left the Dominican Republic to study in Spain, where he studied painting at the Academy of San Fernando in Madrid, Spain. He quickly became interested in the world of fashion design and began sketching for leading Spanish fashion houses, which soon led to an apprenticeship with Spain’s most renowned couturier, Cristóbal Balenciaga. He considers Cristóbal Balenciaga his mentor. Later, de la Renta left Spain to join Antonio del Castillo as a couture assistant at Lanvin in Paris.

In 1963, de la Renta turned to Diana Vreeland, the editor-in-chief of Vogue for advice, saying that what he really wanted was to "get into ready to wear, because that’s where the money is". Vreeland replied, “Then go to Arden because you will make your reputation faster. She is not a designer, so she will promote you. At the other place, you will always be eclipsed by the name of Dior.” De la Renta proceeded to work for Arden for two years before he in 1965 went to work for Jane Derby and launched his own label. When Derby died in August 1965 Oscar de la Renta took over the label. 
From 1993 to 2002, Oscar de la Renta designed the haute couture collection for the house of Balmain, becoming the first Dominican to design for a French couture house. In 2006, the Oscar de la Renta label diversified into bridal wear. 

Oscar de la Renta died on October 20, 2014 at his home in Kent, Connecticut at the age of 82, he had been diagnosed with cancer in 2006. A year before, at the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA), Executive Director Fern Mallis called him “The Sultan of Suave.” At that event, he spoke of his cancer, saying, "Yes, I had cancer. Right now, I am totally clean. The only realities in life are that you are born, and that you die. We always think we are going to live forever. The dying aspect we will never accept. The one thing about having this kind of warning is how you appreciate every single day of life."

(Source: fashion-runways, via originalmeaningofalternative)